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Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | History

5 edition of Factors affecting contraceptive use in Sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Factors affecting contraceptive use in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Published by National Academy Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan.
    • Subjects:
    • Contraception -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
    • Birth control -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-252).

      StatementWorking Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use, Panel on the Population Dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa, Committee on Population, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council.
      SeriesPopulation dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa
      ContributionsNational Research Council (U.S.). Working Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ766.5.A357 F33 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 252 p. :
      Number of Pages252
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1446278M
      ISBN 10030904944X
      LC Control Number93085134
      OCLC/WorldCa28763095


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Factors affecting contraceptive use in Sub-Saharan Africa Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book discusses current trends in contraceptive use, socioeconomic and program variables that affect the demand for and supply of children, and the relationship of increased contraceptive use to recent fertility declines.

Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa. National Research Council (US) Working Group on Factors. FACTORS AFFECTING CONTRACEPTIVE USE In the sub-Saharan African countries that have achieved at least moder- ate success in family planning, the public sector provided the national cov- erage of services that resulted in increases in national contraceptive use.

Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION The Contraceptive Revolution in the Developing World, 5 Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa, 6 Levels of Socioeconomic Organization Affecting Contraceptive Use, 12 Organization of Report, 18 2 LEVELS AND TRENDS IN CONTRACEPTIVE USE Sources of Data on Contraceptive Use, 19 Definition of Contraceptive.

Get this from a library. Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa. [Working Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use, National Research Council.] -- This book discusses current trends in contraceptive use, socioeconomic and program variables that affect the demand for and supply of children, and the relationship of increased contraceptive use to.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Factors affecting contraceptive use in Sub-Saharan Africa. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press,   The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature regarding factors influencing contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa between and A total of 58 studies from twelve Sub-Saharan African countries were reviewed.

Keywords were grouped using the PEN-3. CONTRACEPTIVE USE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA The situation is markedly different in sub-Saharan Africa, where high birth rates have been the norm, and access to modern contraception was extremely limited (except in pilot program areas) prior to Suggested Citation:"Executive Summary."National Research Council.

Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan gton, DC: The National. Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa () Chapter: 7 Contribution of Modern Contraceptive Use Relative to Postpartum Practices to Fertility Decline.

National Research Council (US) Working Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use. Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa. This chapter describes the extent to which contraception is being practiced in sub-Saharan Africa.

We first review sources of data on and definitions of contraceptive use. We then discuss what these data show regarding levels and trends in prevalence and differentials in current use by women.

Next, we look at indicators related to contraceptive use: ever use, discontinuation, contraceptive. There is internal heterogeneity in each world region in terms of sub‐regional contraceptive use. For SSA, Figure 1b shows the large difference in average median use levels between Southern Africa and the other sub‐regions.

Southern Africa's average median use of modern contraception across five countries for – is percent, with the next highest level (. Contraceptive use is the expression of individual desires to space or to limit births. Individual demands for birth spacing and limitation are themselves shaped by the surrounding social, economic, and policy environment.

If our aim is to understand contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa, we must look first to the determinants of the demand for children.

This chapter opens the investigation. South Africa, which has more people living with HIV/AIDS than any other nation, stands out in sub-Saharan Africa for its lower level of moral opposition to contraceptive use.

Just 15% of South Africans said contraception is morally unacceptable, while fully two-thirds (68%) said it. Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa Population Dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa: A Series: : Working Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences: BooksAuthor: Working Group on Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education.

In The Lancet Global Health, Saifuddin Ahmed and colleagues1 present the findings from their study in which they assessed the progress in modern contraceptive prevalence rates since the London Summit on Family Planning in some sub-Saharan African countries.

This programme was launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the UK government, and other partners and laid the. Despite the benefits of contraceptive use, it is estimated that approximately 21% of women in sub-Saharan Africa have an unmet need for modern contraception.

This gap is largely responsible for the high proportion of unintended pregnancies in the region [6], estimated at 38% of the annual total of 51 million pregnancies in sub-Saharan Africa.

alence of injectable contraceptives and identify factors that drive the increase. It discusses the programmatic implications of this trend for the region, especially in terms of contraceptive security and sustainability.

Introduction Although sub-Saharan Africa still has the lowest level of contraceptive. During the s, the self-reported use of modern contraceptives among married women increased in East Africa by 1% each year to 17% by ; in West Africa, it increased by % each year to 8% by 9 Previous research concentrated on individual and household demographic and socioeconomic factors as determinants of the uptake of contraception.

MAJOR TRENDS AFFECTING FAMILIES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA levels of fertility in most of sub-Saharan Africa. These factors include high levels of limited use of contraceptives Factors Affecting Contraceptive Use among Reproductive Aged Women: A Case Study in Worawora Township, Ghana estimates among countries in th e Sub-Saharan.

the Sub-Saharan Africa. Although use of modern contraception in was lower in sub-Saharan Africa compared to other regions, a number of countries in this region have seen a significant increase in recent years. All   However, efforts to improve rates of contraception uptake in low resourced areas such as sub-Saharan Africa should include factors of acceptability (Mwaikambo et al., ).

The contraceptive methods were feared to cause health problems or infertility but there was also mistrust of those promoting and encouraging them.

This appendix explores whether the Eastefiin and Crimmins () synthesis model of reproductive decisions provides an appropriate framework for the study of contraceptive use in Africa. The synthesis perspective centers attention on an individual couple of reproductive age. What is at issue is the number of children the couple expects to bear if no contraception is employed, compared with the.

Bankole and Zulu claim that contraceptive unmet need data in Sub-Saharan Africa derives from data collected only for women [64, 65]. Men’s positive approach makes it easier for women to access and use family planning services, and as a result, availability and continuity in services is ensured [ 66, 67, 68 ].

operational factors that affect use of sexual and reproductive health services include the following: high cost of care and services, inconvenient hours of operation, affordable transportation.

The study assesses the importance of the socioeconomic background and the availability, price, and quality of services on contraceptive use and fertility. InGhana was among the first Sub-Saharan African countries to adopt a population policy.

Today, the average distance to a source of family planning is still about three miles. However, the level of contraceptive practice in many African countries still remains relatively low (Bongaarts and Johansson, ). According to the UNDP (), only 10% of the sexually active population in sub-Saharan Africa use a contraceptive method.

In contrast, the level of contraceptive use in South Africa is. FACTORS AFFECTING CONTRACEPTIVE USE IN GHANA - Volume 29 Issue 2. The relationships between selected demographic and socioeconomic variables and current use status of contraception were examined using logistic regression technique.

The increased availability of contraceptives may affect their relative use by women who have experienced IPV in Sub-Saharan Africa, which could explain the present findings to a significant degree. Interestingly, nearly all women from the sample reported using female-controlled contraception (> 93%), regardless of their experience of spousal.

Women in sub-Saharan Africa, about 35 million of whom cannot access or use family planning, and those living with HIV, have the greatest unmet need.1 3 In one Ugandan survey, three quarters of. Introduction.

Prior toaccess to modern contraceptives was very limited in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), in part because African government officials expressed little support for family planningpostpartum abstinence was the only method of family planning utilized in many African the early s, the occurrence of major political and economic crises.

This article is from Reproductive Health, volume Abstract Background: Despite the increase in contraceptive use worldwide over the last decade, there is still discrepancy in the need to limit birth and utilization of modern contraceptives specifically long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in sub-Saharan Africa including Ethiopia.

Despite recent increases in contraceptive use, sub-Saharan Africa is still characterized by high levels of fertility with TFR of 5 (number of births per woman) and a considerable unmet need for contraception. Sub-Saharan Africa is still undergoing demographic transition (i.e. a shift to low death rate and birth rates).

Addis Ababa: Central Statistics Authority; Stephenson R, Baschieri A, Clements S, Hennink M, Madise N: Contextual influences on modern contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa.

Am J Public Health97(7):1 Stephenson R, Beke A, Tshibangu D: Contextual influences on contraceptive use in the Eastern Cape.

South Africa. Use of modern birth control methods has been shown to decrease female fertility rate in Sub-Saharan Africa. Health. Africa has the highest maternal death rate, which measures the death rate of women due to pregnancy and childbirth.

The maternal mortality ratio in Sub Saharan Africa is 1, maternal deaths perlive births. An article by Baggaley et al. suggests that increasing access. Ethiopia is the second populous country in Africa with a total fertility rate of and contraceptive prevalence of 35%, where implant and intrauterine contraceptive devices account for 8 and 2% respectively.

The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of long acting reversible contraceptives utilization and its associated factors among women of reproductive age in Arsi.

Contraceptive usage by adolescents has been perceived to be influenced by various factors, including, socio-economic status, knowledge about contraceptives, attitudes about issues related to contraceptives, residential area, educational status, counselling received about contraceptives, attitudes of the contraceptive providers, cultural values.

Background: Adolescent pregnancy has been persistently high in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this review is to identify factors influencing adolescent pregnancies in sub-Saharan Africa in. Globally, sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) bears the highest proportion of women with unmet need for contraception as nearly 25% of women of reproductive age in the sub-region have unmet need for contraception.

Unmet need for contraception is predominant among young women. We examined the association between socio-economic and demographic factors and unmet need for contraception. Nonetheless, some sub‐Saharan countries have experienced rapid uptake of contraceptive methods and subsequent fertility declines.

As illustrated in Table 1, several countries (e.g., Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, and Zimbabwe as well as countries in Southern Africa) have led successful family planning programs.(Contraceptive prevalence data presented here combine .contraceptive use among men in urban Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal: a cross-sectional study.

Reprod Health; Moodley J, Naidoo S, Wand H and Ramjee G. Contraception use and impact on pregnancy. prevention in women participating in an HIV prevention trial in South Africa. J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care;–Family planning services have been available at no cost in the public health settings of South Africa sinceand now include the long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) namely, the contraceptive implant and intra-uterine device (IUD).

However, the uptake of LARCs has been declining in the recent years and little is known about the cause of the decline. In many relationships, men may.